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Products > Crassula sarcocaulis
 
Crassula sarcocaulis - Bonsai Crassula
   

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Habit and Cultural Information
Category: Succulent
Family: Crassulaceae (Stonecrops)
Origin: South Africa (Africa)
Evergreen: Yes
Flower Color: Pink & White
Bloomtime: Summer
Height: 1-2 feet
Width: 1-2 feet
Exposure: Sun or Shade
Irrigation (H2O Info): Low Water Needs
Winter Hardiness: 10-15 F
Crassula sarcocaulis (Bonsai Crassula) - A low growing shrub that grows 1 to 2 feet tall with a fat gnarly trunk and stems with peeling bark bearing narrow green succulent leaves and attractive terminal flower clusters in summer. The flowers start as small pink flower buds that open to show off bell-shaped pale-pink flowers which, for some people, may smell of black currant jelly, while to others the scent is more reminiscent to old gym socks. Plant in full sun (except in hot inland desert climates) to light shade in well-drained soils and irrigate occasionally. This plant is considered one of the hardiest of Crassula, tolerating temperatures down to 10 F (-12 C) so it has long been cultivated throughout the temperate regions of the world. As it grows well indoors it can also often be seen in a windowsill garden in even colder climates. With the attractive branching, peeling bark and bare lower stems it resembles a small tree, which makes it a great succulent bonsai plant. It is native to the eastern Cape Province up into the northern Transvaal in South Africa. The name Crassula was a name Linnaean name first used in 1753 and comes from the Latin word 'crassus' meaning "thick" that refers to the thick plump leaves of many of the genus and the specific epithet means "fleshy stems". Our stock plants came from Aloe breeder John Bleck.  The information on this page is based on the research that we have conducted about this plant in the San Marcos Growers library, from what we have found on reliable online sources, as well as from observations made of our crops of this plant growing in the nursery and of plants growing in the nursery's garden and those in other gardens where we may have observed it. We also have incorporated comments received from others and welcome getting feedback from those who may have additional information, particularly if this information includes cultural information that would aid others in growing Crassula sarcocaulis.
 
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