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Products > Sansevieria trifasciata 'Golden Flame'
 
Sansevieria trifasciata 'Golden Flame' - Gold Flame Snake Plant
 
Working on getting this plant out in the field but it is not yet available listing for information only! 
Image of Sansevieria trifasciata 'Golden Flame'
 
Habit and Cultural Information
Category: Succulent
Family: Asparagaceae (~Liliaceae)
Origin: Africa, East (Africa)
Evergreen: Yes
Flower Color: White
Bloomtime: Infrequent
Fragrant Flowers: Yes
Synonyms: [S. 'Gold Flame', Dracaena trifasciata cv.]
Height: 3-4 feet
Width: Clumping
Exposure: Sun or Shade
Summer Dry: Yes
Irrigation (H2O Info): Low Water Needs
Winter Hardiness: 30-32 F
May be Poisonous  (More Info): Yes
Sansevieria trifasciata 'Golden Flame' (Gold Flame Snake Plant) - An upright vase shaped plant to 18 inches tall with rosettes of broad dark green, sword-shaped leaves that are slightly recurving and have wide golden yellow vertical stripes and new leaves that often emerge totally yellow. Will tolerate low light levels but grows best and perhaps flowers better (we have yet to see this cultivar bloom) when given bright light. Should prove hardy to 30-32 F. Water sparingly and not at all as temperatures dip in winter, particularly if growing outdoors - can tolerate going months between watering and if grown outdoors in California does need to be kept under an eave or some other protection from winter rainfall and cold. Golden Flame is one of the more decorative of the snake plants and is a great container plant for interior or exterior use that needs little care. . The name for the genus was originally Sanseverinia as named by the Italian botanist Vincenzo Petagna in honor of his patron, Pietro Antonio Sanseverino, the Count of Chiaromonte (1724-1771), but the name was altered for unknown reasons by the Swedish naturalist Carl Peter Thunberg, possibly influenced by the name of Raimondo di Sangro (17101771), prince of San Severo in Italy. The specific epithet combines the Latin words 'tri" meaning three with 'fasciatus' meaning "banded" in reference to the many leaf markings. Long placed in the Agavaceae, the Dracaenaceae and by some in the Ruscaceae families, Sansevieria was most recently placed in the subfamily Nolinoideae within the Asparagaceae family. Molecular phylogenetic studies have persuaded some to include Sansevieria in the genus Dracaena, which would make this plants name Dracaena trifasciata. Because of considerable disagreement over this change, the long standing use of its old name, and so not to cause our own and customer confusion, we continue to list this plant as a Sansevieria. This plant is sometimes listed as Sansevieria 'Gold Flame' and we are not sure which name is actually correct or who first introduced it. Local Santa Barbara gardener Bruno Bardini gave us our first plant of this cultivar in 2019 and we later purchased stock plants of it at Home Depot who received it as part of the Costa Farms Easy Care Tropicals plant line, and there it was labeled Sansevieria trifasciata 'Golden Flame' .  The information about Sansevieria trifasciata 'Golden Flame' displayed on this page is based on research conducted in our library and from reliable online resources. We also relate observations made about it as it grows in our nursery gardens and other gardens we visit, as well how the crops have performed in containers in our nursery field. We will also incorporate comments we receive from others, and we welcome hearing from anyone with additional information, particularly if they can share cultural information that would aid others in growing it.
 
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