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NEW  2022 PLANTS

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Products > Agave x ovatisana
 
Agave x ovatisana
   

 
Habit and Cultural Information
Category: Succulent
Family: Agavaceae (now Asparagaceae)
Origin: Mexico (North America)
Evergreen: Yes
Bloomtime: Infrequent
Parentage: (Agave ovatifolia x A. parrasana)
Height: 3-5 feet
Width: 4-6 feet
Exposure: Full Sun
Summer Dry: Yes
Deer Tolerant: Yes
Irrigation (H2O Info): Low Water Needs
May be Poisonous  (More Info): Yes
Agave x ovatisana (Agave ovatifolia x A. parrasana) An interesting cross between two medium-large Mexican agaves. Plant in full sun and irrigate infrequently. Both plants are fairly cold hardy so should be able to withstand cold temperatures down to 15 to 20 F. We grew this hybrid from seed produced from a cross made between the seed parent Whale's Tongue AgaveAgave ovatifolia that comes from 3,700 to 7,000 feet in the Sierra de Lampazos in northern Nuevo Leon in northeastern Mexico and the pollen parent Cabbage Head Agave Agave parrasana that comes from the Parras mountains of southeastern Coahuila, Mexico at elevations from 4,500 to just over 8,000 feet. This hybridization work was performed by Brian Kemble when the two plants flowered at the Ruth Bancroft Garden in Walnut Creek California in 2020 and we received the seed in July 2021.  Information displayed on this page about  Agave x ovatisana is based on the research conducted about it in our library and from reliable online resources. We also note those observations we have made of this plant as it grows in the nursery's garden and in other gardens, as well how crops have performed in our nursery field. We will incorporate comments we receive from others, and welcome to hear from anyone who may have additional information, particularly if they share any cultural information that would aid others in growing it.
 
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