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Products > Aloe divaricata
 
Aloe divaricata
   
Image of Aloe divaricata
[2nd Image]
Habit and Cultural Information
Category: Succulent
Family: Aloeaceae (now Asphodeloideae)
Origin: Madagascar
Evergreen: Yes
Red/Purple Foliage: Yes
Flower Color: Red
Bloomtime: Winter
Height: 4-8 feet
Width: 3-4 feet
Exposure: Full Sun
Seaside: Yes
Irrigation (H2O Info): Low Water Needs
Winter Hardiness: 25-30 F
May be Poisonous  (More Info): Yes
Aloe divaricata - An upright suckering aloe (solitary clones exist) that can reach 5 to 7 feet tall thin stems holding rosettes of 18 inch long recurved narrow leaves at branch ends with older leaves skirting the stems. These leaves have prominent sharp red teeth and take on a wide range of colors with blue-green being blushed with red and a gray purple color when grown in full sun. In winter appear the 3 foot tall airy multibranched inflorescences rising above the foliage with racemes of well-spaced deep red colored flowers. Plant in full sun in a well-drained soil and irrigate occasionally to infrequently. Hardy to 25 F. An attractive and interesting narrow growing plant that that can be used as a focal plant in the ground, as a large potted specimen, or planted close as medium height hedge. This plant is widespread in the wild within in arid bush vegetation and coastal thickets on sandy soils from sea level up to 2,600 feet in elevation in the western and southern Madagascar. The specific epithet comes from the Latin word meaning "spread out" in reference to the branches of the inflorescence. Our plants from the Huntington Botanic Garden from seed collected in 1998 by Alexandre Viossat.  This information is based on research conducted about this plant in our nursery library and from reliable online sources. We also take into consideration observations of it in our nursery of crops, as well as of plants growing in the nursery's garden and those in other gardens we have visited. We will incorporate comments received from others and welcome getting feedback from anyone who may have additional information, particularly if it includes cultural information that would aid others in growing Aloe divaricata.
 
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