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Products > Cissus striata
 
Cissus striata - Miniature Grape Ivy
   

 
Habit and Cultural Information
Category: Vine
Family: Vitaceae (Grapes)
Origin: Chile (South America)
Evergreen: Yes
Flower Color: NA
Bloomtime: Not Significant
Synonyms: [Ampelopsis/Parthenocissus sempervirens] )
Height: Climbing (Vine)
Width: Spreading
Exposure: Sun or Shade
Irrigation (H2O Info): Medium Water Needs
Winter Hardiness: 15-20° F
Cissus striata (Miniature Grape Ivy) - This delicate, evergreen vine can climb using tendrils to 20 feet tall. It has red stems that hold 1 to 2 inch long leathery palmately-compound leaves that have 5 lobes. The small greenish-yellow flowers in late summer to fall are not showy but are followed by dark berries that look great against the very attractive foliage in winter. It can be grown on a fence or other support as a vine or used in the open as a groundcover or even in a hanging basket. Plant in cool full sun or shade, with moderate to occasional water. It is hardy to about 20-25 degrees F. This plant was first described from Chile by Hipólito Ruiz López and José Antonio Pavon from a collection in 1798. It is known to come from south central Chile, where it is called Voqui Colorado, but also ranges through parts of Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Paraguay and Bolivia. It is sometimes called by the common name Ivy of Uruguay as this name was applied to the plant by John Tweedie at Kew and since it is evergreen it is also sometimes called Evergreen Virginia Creeper. It has also been know by the botanical names Ampelopsis sempervirens, Parthenocissus striata and Vitis striata.  The information provided on this page is based on research we have conducted about this plant in our nursery's library, from what we have found about it on reliable online sources, as well as from observations in our nursery of crops of this plant as well as of plants growing in the nursery's garden and those in other gardens. We will also incorporate comments received from others and welcome getting feedback from anyone who may have additional information, particularly if it includes cultural information that would aid others in growing  Cissus striata.
 
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