San Marcos GrowersSan Marcos Growers
New User?
Wholesale Login
Enter Password
Home Products Purchase Gardens About Us Resources Contact Us
Search Utilities
Plant Database
Search by Plant Name
Advanced Search
Search by size, origins,
color, cultural needs, etc.
Website Search
Search for any word
Site Map
Retail Locator
Plant Listings

PLANT TYPE
PLANT GEOGRAPHY
ALL PLANT LIST
PLANT IMAGE INDEX
PLANT INTROS
SPECIALTY CROPS
NEW  2021 PLANTS

PRIME LIST
  for MARCH


 Weather Station

 
Products > Aloe inermis
 
Aloe inermis - Toothless Aloe
  
Working on getting this plant back in the field but it is currently not available listing for information only!

 
Habit and Cultural Information
Category: Succulent
Family: Aloeaceae (now Asphodeloideae)
Origin: Yemen (Asia)
Evergreen: Yes
Flower Color: Salmon
Bloomtime: Fall/Winter
Height: 1-2 feet
Width: 3-4 feet
Exposure: Sun or Shade
Summer Dry: Yes
Irrigation (H2O Info): Low Water Needs
Winter Hardiness: 25-30 F
Aloe inermis (Toothless Aloe) A suckering small shrubby aloe that forms clumps to 2 feet tall of open rosettes of long narrow decurving pale olive green leaves on short stems that are smooth to the touch with a deep central channel and toothless margins. In fall into winter appear the 2 to 3 foot foot tall branching inflorescence with salmon red flower buds that are purple green at the tip and open with green stripped cream petal lobes. Plant in full sun in a well-drained soil and irrigate occasionally to very little - quite drought tolerant and hardy to around 25 F. This is an attractive and unusual aloe as a garden or pot specimen with no teeth or other sharp pointed appendages. This plant, one of the non-African species, is native to western Yemen where it has a wide distribution between Taizz and Dhala growing on rocky slopes at around 2,500 feet in elevation. It is related to a similar African species Aloe kahinii and to the more common but stemless Aloe fleurentiniorum, also from Yemen. The specific epithet is the Latin word meaning "unarmed" in referece to the toothless leaf margins. Our plants from cuttings off a plant in the garden of Jeff Chemnick that was originally given to him by Dylan Hannon, Curator of the Conservatory at the Huntington Botanical Gardens.  The information provided on this page is based on the research we have conducted about this plant in our nursery library, from what we have found about it on reliable online sources, as well as from observations of our nursery crops of this plant as well as of plants growing in the nursery's garden and those in other gardens. We also will incorporate comments received from others and welcome getting feedback from anyone who may have additional information, particularly if this information includes cultural information that would aid others in growing Aloe inermis.
 
  [MORE INFO]