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Products > Ceanothus 'Concha'
 
Ceanothus 'Concha' - Concha Ceanothus
   
Image of Ceanothus 'Concha'
[2nd Image]
Habit and Cultural Information
Category: Shrub
Family: Rhamnaceae (Buckthorns)
Origin: California (U.S.A.)
Evergreen: Yes
Flower Color: Dark Blue
Bloomtime: Spring
Parentage: (C. impressus x C. papillosus var. roweanus)
Height: 6-8 feet
Width: 6-12 feet
Exposure: Full Sun
Summer Dry: Yes
Deer Tolerant: Yes
Irrigation (H2O Info): Low Water Needs
Winter Hardiness: 10-15° F
Ceanothus 'Concha' (Concha Ceanothus) - A shrub with arching branches that may eventually reach 8' tall by about 10' wide, composed of narrow, 1" long, dark green leaves. A profusion of deep blue flower clusters emerge from reddish buds in spring. Plant in full sun for maximum flowering. Established plants need no summer water but will tolerate it; this attribute and its abundant flowering account for Concha’s reputation as one of the best, most reliable ceanothus cultivars. It also tolerates a wide range of soils and alkalinity. Hardy to 10 degrees F without damage. This venerable cultivar was discovered in 1946 and then named in 1949 by Charles Samms, who found it growing in his Bee Line Nursery in San Dimas (later in Aptos). It is thought to be a hybrid between Ceanothus impressus and Ceanothus papillosus var. roweanus (now considered to just be a compact form of Ceanothus papillosus). It has long been considered to be one of the best of the of California Lilacs. The genus name comes from the Greek word keanthos which was used to describe a type of thistle and meaning a "thorny plant" or "spiny plant" and first used by Linnaeus in 1753 to describe New Jersey Tea, Ceanothus americanusInformation displayed on this page about  Ceanothus 'Concha' is based on the research conducted about it in our library and from reliable online resources. We also note those observations we have made of this plant as it grows in the nursery's garden and in other gardens, as well how crops have performed in our nursery field. We will incorporate comments we receive from others, and welcome to hear from anyone who may have additional information, particularly if they share any cultural information that would aid others in growing it.
 
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