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Products > Parthenocissus 'Hacienda Creeper'
 
Parthenocissus 'Hacienda Creeper' - Rancho Viejo Creeper
   
Image of Parthenocissus 'Hacienda Creeper'
[2nd Image]
Habit and Cultural Information
Category: Vine
Family: Vitaceae (Grapes)
Origin: Garden Origin
Evergreen: Yes
Red/Purple Foliage: Yes
Flower Color: NA
Bloomtime: Not Significant
Synonyms: [P. 'Rancho Viejo']
Height: Climbing (Vine)
Width: Spreading
Exposure: Sun or Shade
Summer Dry: Yes
Irrigation (H2O Info): Low Water Needs
Winter Hardiness: 0-10 F
Parthenocissus 'Hacienda Creeper' (Rancho Viejo Creeper) - This vine resembles the related Virginia Creeper, Parthenocissus quinquefolia, but is much smaller and slower growing and is evergreen in mild climates. The bright green palmate leaves are quite attractive and in areas that do not experience sharp frosts or drop down into the low 20s F, it will turn a reddish color in fall and retain its foliage until it is replaced by flushes of new bright green leaves in spring. This vining plant clings to fences or other structures, making it a great screening plant but it can also be used as a groundcover. Plant in full sun to part shade. Tolerates poor soils and some drought. Hardy to USDA Zone 7 (0F.). This plant was discovered by Scott Ogden growing at an old hacienda in Mexico. The name Parthenocissus comes from Greek word 'parthenos' meaning "virgin" and 'kissos' (Latinized as 'cissus"), an ancient name for an ivy-like vine. The reasons given for this name vary with some believing it comes from the fact that some species in the genus form seeds without pollination (Apomixis) or that the scientific name actually was in reference to the English common name "Virginia creeper" for this plant since Virginia was named for Queen Elizabeth I, also known as the the "Virgin Queen".  This information is based on research conducted about this plant in our nursery library and from reliable online sources. We also take into consideration observations of it in our nursery of crops, as well as of plants growing in the nursery's garden and those in other gardens we have visited. We will incorporate comments received from others and welcome getting feedback from anyone who may have additional information, particularly if it includes cultural information that would aid others in growing Parthenocissus 'Hacienda Creeper'.
 
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