San Marcos Growers LogoSan Marcos Growers
New User
Wholesale Login
Enter Password
Home Products Purchase Gardens About Us Resources Contact Us
COVID-19 Response
Search Utilities
Plant Database
Search by Plant Name
Advanced Search Avanced Search Go Button
Search by size, origins,
color, cultural needs, etc.
Website Search Search Website GO button
Search for any word
Site Map
Retail Locator
Plant Listings

PLANT TYPE
PLANT GEOGRAPHY
PLANT INDEX
ALL PLANT LIST
PLANT IMAGE INDEX
PLANT INTROS
SPECIALTY CROPS
NEW  2021 PLANTS

PRIME LIST
  for AUGUST


Natives at San Marcos Growers
Succulents at San Marcos Growers
 Weather Station

 
Products > Stomatium agninum
 
Stomatium agninum - Lamb's Tongue
   
Image of Stomatium agninum
[2nd Image]
Habit and Cultural Information
Category: Succulent
Family: Aizoaceae (Ice Plants)
Origin: South Africa (Africa)
Evergreen: Yes
Flower Color: Yellow
Bloomtime: Summer
Synonyms: [Mesembryanthemum agninum, Agnirictus aginus]
Height: <1 foot
Width: Spreading
Exposure: Full Sun
Irrigation (H2O Info): Low Water Needs
Winter Hardiness: 20-25 F
Stomatium agninum (Lamb's Tongue) - This succulent from the Cape Province of South Africa has dull green rhombodial leaves with rough dots and soft teeth near the tips and are grouped 6 to 8 in opposite pairs. Large bright yellow flowers can appear in leaf axils in summer if plant is stressed - more often this plant does not bloom. Plant in full sun to light shade in a well-drained soil and water only ocassionally. Makes an excellent dense groundcover for a rock garden or mixed succulent planting. The name of the genus comes from the Greek word 'stomation' meaning "open mouth" in reference to the pairs of toothed leaf pairs that resemble a wide open mouth. The specific epithet is from the Latin word 'agninus' meaning "of a lamb or "fleecy", likely referring to its texture. This name carries over to the few common names we have uncovered such as Lamb's Tongue and Lamb's-chop. It is endemic to the Eastern Cape province of South Africa and has previously been called Mesembryanthemum agninum and Agnirictus aginus. We received this plant as an unidentified mesemb from Tony Dinuzzo of Tony's Cactus Garden Nursery in Buellton, CA where he had large patches of this plant growing out in the open in full sun and winter temperatures to 20 F. We thought it was Faucaria or a species of Rabiea but finally got a plant to Steven Hammer who identified it as Stomatium agninum. He also noted that this plant was rather shy to bloom and that it can be very gray to almost silver when grown very dry. We have been growing this great plant since 2003.  This information is based on research conducted about this plant in our nursery library and from reliable online sources. We also take into consideration observations of it in our nursery of crops, as well as of plants growing in the nursery's garden and those in other gardens we have visited. We will incorporate comments received from others and welcome getting feedback from anyone who may have additional information, particularly if it includes cultural information that would aid others in growing Stomatium agninum.
 
  [MORE INFO]