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Products > Ophiopogon japonicus
 
Ophiopogon japonicus - Mondo Grass
   

 
Habit and Cultural Information
Category: Grass-like
Family: Liliaceae (Lilies)
Origin: Japan (Asia)
Evergreen: Yes
Flower Color: Light Lavender
Bloomtime: Summer
Height: <1 foot
Width: Spreading
Exposure: Cool Sun/Light Shade
Irrigation (H2O Info): Medium Water Needs
Winter Hardiness: 10-15 F
Ophiopogon japonicus (Mondo Grass) - Evergreen, thin grass-like foliage reaching 6-9 inches tall and spreads by tuber roots and stolons. The summer-blooming pale lilac flowers are usually hidden among the foliage. Blue fruits follow bloom. Ideal for use around the base of trees where most plants will not grow. Best in shady locations in inland gardens, but will take full sun along the coast. Water occasionally to regularly. Ophiopogon japonicus is native to China, India, Japan, and Vietnam. The name for the genus comes from the Greek words 'ophis' meaning a "snake" and 'pogon' meaning a "beard", "hair" or "tuft" originating from the Japanese name meaning Snakes Beard for the plant. The specific epithet means "from Japan". Other common names include Dwarf Lilyturf, Snakes Beard, Fountainplant and Monkeygrass.  Information displayed on this page is based on the research conducted about this plant in our library and from reliable online resources. We also note those observations we have made of this plant as it is growing in the nursery's garden and in other gardens, as well how it has performed in the crops out in our nursery field. We will also incorporate comments we receive from others, and welcome to hear from anyone who may have additional information, particularly if they have knowledge of cultural information we do not mention that would aid others in growing Ophiopogon japonicus.